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ACES HIGH

 

 

Professional, Released On Cassette Only

 

Game Type††††††††† : Computerised Card Games

Author†† ††††††††††† :

Release Information††††††† : 1984: ACES HIGH, Oasis, £9.95

Compilation Comprises†† :† 1. BLACKJACK

††††††††††††††††† †† 2. PONTOON

††††††††††††††††† †† 3. DRAW-POKER

††††††††††††††††† †† 4. STUD POKER

Stated compatibility††† : Electron

Actual compatibility††† : Electron, BBC B, B+ and Master 128

Supplier††††††††††† : OASIS. No futher information given.

Disc compatibility†††† : CDFS E00, DFS E00

 

 

Instructions

Forget the baize table. No more shuffling those old playing cards. ACES HIGH brings four of the most popular casino-type games to the screen of your computer in amazing high resolution colour graphics.

 

These top specification programs contain the vital balance of skill and chance which has made games such as blackjack, poker and pontoon universally popular.

 

††† †† Written for one to five players with several levels of play

††† †† More than one player, and the computer takes the banker's chair. For a one to one, you're the banker and the computer has to outwit you

††† †† At no time can the computer 'see' other players' hands or take account of them

††† †† Reverses, stakes and 'pots' clearly displayed at all times, with a 'win or lose' analysis and pay-out after each hand

 

BLACKJACK - Bets are placed on the first card dealt and from then on strong nerve is a necessity as you go for the 'natural'. Includes such features as doubling of stakes and splitting the hand.

 

PONTOON - The great British game of chance. To 'stick', to 'twist' or to 'buy'; that is the question, in search of that elusive Pontoon or Five Card Trick.

 

DRAW-POKER - Conjures up the world's favourite form of poker. All the features you'd expect; 'calling', 'checking', 'raising', 'folding', discarding of cards and two rounds of betting.

 

STUD POKER - The most popular variation. Cards are dealt one at a time with a round of betting in between. All the usual features and as in Draw Poker, the program recognises all the standard poker hands.

 

ACES HIGH comes with a full instruction booklet.

 

ACES HIGH IS JUST ONE IN A SERIES OF QUALITY OASIS SOFTWARE PACKAGES!

 

Welcome to the BBC Model B and Electron Card Games Compendium. Thank you for your purchase. We call it "The Best Deal Yet" and we don't think that you will be disappointed.

 

Now, in the comfort of your own home, you can enjoy that old favourite, Pontoon, or imagine yourself on that old Mississippi paddle boat steamer - or that Wild West Saloon, where the stakes are high in Stud and Draw Poker; you can join in with the Jet-Set or Film Star circles in the Casinos of Las Vegas or Monte Carlo, playing for all, in Blackjack!

 

Many hours of fun are here - all that's required is your imagination!

 

Draw Poker

Draw Poker is a computer program that allows you to play five card Draw Poker against the BBC Model B or Electron Microcomputer. Several levels of play are provided, giving the player the opportunity of playing with up to five 'computerised opponents'.

Playing Instructions

To load DRAW-POKER, rewind the tape and type *LOAD "DRAW-POKER" followed by RETURN, then press PLAY on the cassette recorder. When the program has loaded, type OLD followed by RETURN, then type RUN followed by RETURN.

 

After the title sequence, the player is invited to enter his skill level on the keyboard - what this does, is to set your number of computer opponents. The more you have, the more difficult the game. There is no need to press the RETURN key for this, or indeed, with only one exception, any input during the game.

 

Each player has a thousand pounds to bet with, in units of one pound - when this is exhausted, the player concerned takes no further part in the game.

 

Each player is dealt five concealed cards. The human player's cards in the top left hand corner are turned up for him, but none of the computerised opponents can see them, or take them into account in their play. The first round of betting now takes place. The human player is first and may FOLD, CHECK, CALL or RAISE by entering 1, 2, 3 or 4 when prompted to do so. Each player's remaining cash and last bet are displayed near their cards. The minimum bet is one pound and the maximum is one hundred pounds.

 

1. FOLD: If a player chooses to 'Fold', he puts no more money into the pot, but he loses any money he has already put in, and takes no further part in the hand.

 

2. CHECK: If a player chooses to 'Check', he does not put money in during this round, but may do so at his next turn. If all the players 'Check', the round of betting is over.

 

3. CALL: If a player chooses to 'Call', he must stay in the game at minimum cost, by putting in the same amount as the previous player's bet - this is done automatically by the computer.

 

4. RAISE: If a player chooses to 'Call', he must put in more than the previous bet. The minimum bet is the previous bet plus one pound. The maximum is one hundred pounds. All players must then 'Call' so that they contribute the same amount of money during the round.

 

If the human player chooses to 'Raise', he will be asked 'HOW MANY' cards he wishes to discard - you may replace up to five cards, or, if none are required, enter zero for a 'Pat' hand. If you press '4' in error, a bet of zero will return you to the menu.

 

NOTE: When raising, if the figure that you enter is less than three digits, eg. 7 or, say, 75; then press RETURN to complete the entry.

 

The Draw

If the human player is still in the game, you will be asked 'HOW MANY' cards you wish to discard. You may replace up to five, or enter zero for a 'Pat' hand.

 

You will now be asked which cards you wish to be replaced, numbering from one on the left, to five on the right of your hand eg. if you wish to replace 2, 4 and 5; enter 245 and your cards will be replaced - the hand will be displayed again, with your new cards replacing the discarded ones.

 

Your opponents will now choose their discards - the number chosen will be displayed at their position.

 

A second round of betting now takes place. When all of the remaining players have called, the computer will sort and display their cards. The money in the pot will be awarded to the winner who will be indicated. The human player will be asked to press RETURN when he is ready to continue.

 

The computer will shuffle the cards and deal the next hand. The game will be over when the human player loses all his money or bankrupts his opponent.

 

The Rules Of The Game

At the start of a hand, each player is dealt five cards face down. A player may look only at his own hand. The first player to open the betting may bet or check. Each player has the option, in his turn, of: dropping out ('folding'); putting in as much as the last bet ('calling'); or putting more than the last bet ('raising'). When all the active players have put the same amount of money into the pot, the first round of betting is over. The remaining players may then discard any or all of the cards from their hand, and receive in their place, an equal number of new cards from the unseen pack. This process, known as the draw, is conducted in clockwise order, starting from the first player.

 

Once the draw has taken place, there is a second round of betting, which is over when all the remaining players have put the same amount of money into the pot. The players all put the same amount of money into the pot. The players all turn over their cards and the player with the best hand takes the pot.

 

Ranking Of The Cards

In Draw Poker, the Ace is always taken as HIGH. i.e. A, 2, 3, 4, 5 is NOT a straight, whereas 10, J, Q, K, A IS a straight.

 

Wild cards are not recognised in the game.

 

In order to determine the best hand, the following ranking applies (in descending order of value):

 

1. STRAIGHT FLUSH: Five cards of the same suit in an unbroken sequence, e.g. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 of the same suit.

 

2. FOUR OF A KIND: Four cards of the same denomination, e.g. four Aces plus one other card.

 

3. FULL HOUSE: Three cards of the same denomination, plus two cards of any other denomination, e.g. Three Kings plus two Aces.

 

4. FLUSH: Five cards of the same suit NOT in an unbroken sequence. e.g. 2, 4, 5, 7 Q of the same suit.

 

5. STRAIGHT: Five cards of different suits in an unbroken sequence. e.g. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 of any suit.

 

6. THREE OF A KIND: Three cards of one denomination, plus two different cards. e.g. Three Aces plus King and 9 of any suit.

 

7. TWO PAIRS: Two sets of two cards of same denomination, plus one other card. e.g. Two 5s plus two 9s and any other card (excluding 5 and 9). The fifth card is used as a tie-breaker in the event of two players having the same two pairs.

 

8. ONE PAIR: One set of two cards of the same denomination, plus three other cards. e.g. Two 5s plus any other three cards (excluding 5). The other three cards are used as tie breakers in the event of two players having the same pair.

 

9. HIGH CARD: If none of the above hands are possible, the value of the hand is taken as the value of the highest card in the hand. If two or more players have the same high card, the second highest cards are compared, and so on, until a winner is found.

 

Stud Poker

Stud Poker is a computer program that allows you to play five card Stud Poker against the BBC Model B or Electron Microcomputer. Several levels of play are provided, giving the player the opportunity of playing with up to five 'Computerised opponents'.

 

Playing Instructions

To load STUD-POKER, rewind the tape and type *LOAD "STUD-POKER" followed by RETURN, then press PLAY on the cassette recorder. When the program has loaded, type OLD followed by RETURN, then type RUN followed by RETURN.

 

After the title sequence, the player is asked to enter his skill level on the Keyboard - what this does is to set the number of computer opponents; the more you have, the more difficult the game. There is no need to press the RETURN key for this, or indeed, any input during the game.

 

Each player has a thousand pounds to bet with, in units of one pound - when this is exhausted, the player concerned takes no further part in the game.

 

Each player is dealt one down card. The human player's down card in the op left hand corner is turned up for him - though none of the computerised opponents can see it, or take it into account in their play. Each player is obliged to contribute an ante of two pounds at this stage, which goes into a pot in the centre of the table - this is done automatically by the computer. The first card up is dealt, and the first round of betting now takes place. The human player is first and may FOLD, CHECK, CALL or RAISE by entering 1, 2, 3 or 4 when prompted to do so. Each player's remaining cash and last bet are displayed near their cards. The minimum bet is one pound and the maximum is one hundred pounds or the amount in the pot, whichever is the least.

 

1. FOLD: If the player 'FOLDS' he puts no more money into the pot but he forfeits any money he has already put in, and takes no further part in the hand.

 

2. CHECK: This means that a player does not wish to put money in at this stage, but may do so at his next turn. If all the players check, the round of betting is over.

 

3. CALL: This is putting in the same amount as the previous player's bet is order to stay in the game - this is done automatically by the computer.

 

4. RAISE: This is putting in more than the previous better, the minimum is the previous bet plus one pound. All players must then call so that they contribute the same amount of money during the round.

 

If the human player chooses to 'raise', he will be asked the amount of his bet; if it is within the limits, and he has enough remaining cash, it will be accepted, otherwise he will be asked to re-enter it. If he has pressed '4' in error, a bet of zero will return him to the menu.

 

NOTE: When raising, if the figure that you enter is less than 2 or 3 digits, depending on how much you are permitted to bet, then press RETURN to complete your entry.

 

When all rounds of betting have been completed in this way, the computer will sort and display the cards of the remaining players. The money in the pot will be awarded to the winner, who will be indicated. The human players will be asked to press RETURN when he is ready to continue.

 

The computer shuffles the cards and starts to deal the next hand. The game will be over when the human player loses all his money or bankrupts his opponents.

 

The Rules Of The Game

At the start of a hand, each player is dealt one card 'face down' and one card 'face up'. A player may look only at his own 'face down' card. A round of betting now takes place and all those who put in the necessary amount of money on this round, will stay in the game and receive a second 'face up' card. After receiving this card, those who put in the money stay in the game, the others drop out. The third 'face up' card is followed by another round of betting, then the fourth, and final round of betting now takes place. When the last round of betting is complete, those remaining in the game turn over their hands - the player with the best five cards wins the money (pot).

 

Ranking Of The Cards

In Stud Poker, the Ace is always taken as HIGH. i.e. A, 2, 3, 4, 5 is NOT a straight, whereas 10, J, Q, K, A IS a straight.

 

Wild cards are not recognised in the game.

 

In order to determine the best hand, the following ranking applies (in descending order of value):

 

1. STRAIGHT FLUSH: Five cards of the same suit in an unbroken sequence. e.g. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 of the same suit.

 

2. FOUR OF A KIND: Four cards of the same denomination. e.g. Four Aces plus one other card.

 

3. FULL HOUSE: Three cards of the same denomination, plus two cards of any other denomination, e.g. Three Kings plus two Aces.

 

4. FLUSH: Five cards of the same suit NOT in an unbroken sequence. e.g. 2, 4, 5, 7, Q of the same suit.

 

5. STRAIGHT: Five cards of different suits in an unbroken sequence. e.g. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 of any suit.

 

6. THREE OF A KIND: Three cards of one denomination, plus two different cards. e.g. Three Aces plus King and three of any suit.

 

7. TWO PAIRS: Two sets of two cards of same denomination, plus one other card. e.g. Two 5s plus two 9s and any other card (excluding 5 and 9). The fifth card is used as a tie-breaker in the event of two players having the same two pairs.

 

8. ONE PAIR: One set of two cards of the same denomination, plus three other cards. e.g. Two 5s plus any three other cards (excluding 5). The other three cards are used as tie breakers in the event of two players having the same pair.

 

9. HIGH CARD: If none of the above hands are possible, the value of the hand is taken as the value of the highest card in the hand. If two or more players have the same high card, the second highest cards are compared, and so on, until a winner is found.

 

Vingt-un

Vingt-un (Pontoon) is a computer program that allows one player (punter) to play Vingt-un against the BBC Model B or Electron Microcomputer, with alternating banker, or, with up to five bankers, with the computer always playing the banker.

 

Playing Instructions

To load VINGT-UN, rewind the tape and type *LOAD "VINGT-UN" followed by RETURN, then press PLAY on the cassette recorder. When the program has loaded, type OLD followed by RETURN, then type RUN followed by RETURN.

 

After the title sequence, the player is invited to enter the number of punters who wish to play the game against the computer. If there is more than one punter, the computer remains as banker throughout the game. If there is only to be one punter, the computer may or may not start as banker, and the banker changes hands as with a normal game; the identity of the banker will be indicated.

 

Each punter has one thousand pounds to bet with and takes no further part in the game should he run out of money. The game ends when all of the punters, or the computer, runs out of money - the program being then re-run.

 

Each punter is dealt one card. The computer's cards are in the top left hand corner, face down. The other punters' cards are face up, but the computer cannot 'see' them or take them into account in its play.

 

The first punter is invited to make his bet on his first card. The minimum bet is one pound, and the maximum one hundred pounds. The other punters make their bets in the same way and if the punter makes a bet, he receives a second card. Each punter is invited to TWIST (enter T), STICK (enter S) or BUY (enter B) as in a normal game, until he is satisfied with his total or 'BUST'. If he buys a card he is invited to make his first bet, his stake is increased, but the card is dealt face up for

convenience.

 

NOTE: If, when betting, the figure that you enter is less than three digits, press RETURN to complete your entry.

 

After the banker's play, each punters' loss or gain will be indicated in turn before going on to the next hand.

 

When the punter is banker (one opponent game), the computer has the chance to STICK, TWIST (face up) or BUY (face down), before the human punter. Any change of banker will be indicated.

 

The Rules Of The Game

A standard 52 card pack is used. Suits are irrelevant, only the face value of the cards is important. Cards from two to ten count as their spot value, court cards count as ten and Aces count one or eleven - at the player's discretion. The cards are only shuffled at the start of the game, or if the bank changes hands.

 

The object of the game, is to finish with a better hand than the banker's. A hand whose cards total over 21 is 'BUST' and loses. A hand totalling 16 or 21 beats the banker if the banker has a lower scoring hand, or is 'BUST'.

 

There are three special hands:

 

ROYAL PONTOON: Three sevens beat all other hands, and wins triple. This hand only applies to a punter, a banker's three sevens count as a normal 21.

 

PONTOON: 21 on two cards. This beats the banker, unless he has a PONTOON, and wins double.

 

FIVE CARD TRICK: A hand of five cards that is not 'BUST'. This beats all except banker's PONTOON or FIVE CARD TRICK and wins double.

 

The Play

Each player receives his first card, and stakes on it an amount that lies between agreed limits, entitling him to receive a second card. The banker addresses himself to each player in turn, and finishes transactions with one player before he proceeds to the next. If the player is satisfied with his total, and requires no more cards, he says 'STICK' or is 'BUST'. He may acquire more cards by 'TWISTING' them face up, or buying them face down and increasing his stake. The banker must play before collecting the stakes of players who are 'BUST'. He turns his own cards face up, and deals himself more cards until he is satisfied with his total. If he is 'BUST', he collects the stakes of players who are 'BUST' and pays the others the amount they staked (double or triple for special hands). If he has a PONTOON, he collects double stake from everybody unless they have a ROYAL PONTOON. If he has a FIVE CARD TRICK, he collects double from everybody unless they have a PONTOON or ROYAL PONTOON. If the banker's hand has a score of less than 22 (i.e. he is not 'BUST') he pays those with a higher count or better hand, and collects from those who with equal, lower or 'BUST' hands.

 

The cards are not shuffled, but are gathered up and placed at the bottom of the pack for the next deal. The bank changes hands when a player other than the banker has a PONTOON.

 

Blackjack

Blackjack is a computer program that allows one player (punter) to play Blackjack against the BBC Model B or Electron Microcomputer, with alternating banker or with up to five punters, with the computer always playing as banker.

 

Playing Instructions

To load BLACKJACK, rewind the tape and type *LOAD "BLACKJACK" followed by RETURN, then press PLAY on the cassette recorder. When the program has loaded, type OLD followed by RETURN, then type RUN followed by RETURN.

 

After the title sequence, the player is invited to enter the number of punters who wish to play BLACKJACK against the computer. If there is more than one punter, the computer remains as banker throughout the game. If there is one punter, the computer may or may not start as the banker and the bank changes hands as in a normal game. The identity of the banker will be indicated.

 

Each punter has one thousand pounds to bet with and takes no further part in the game when he runs out of money. The game ends when all of the punters, or the computer, runs out of money.

 

Each punter is dealt one card. The computer's cards are in the top left hand corner, face down. The other punters' cards are face up, as the other punters are playing against the banker, not each other. The computer cannot 'see' the other punters' cards or take them into account in its play.

 

The first punter is asked to bet on his first card. The minimum bet is one pound and the maximum one hundred pounds. The other punters make their bets in the same way, and if a punter makes a bet, he receives a second card.

 

NOTE: If, when betting, the figure that you enter is less than 3 digits, press RETURN to complete your entry.

 

If the first two cards are of the same rank, a punter is asked if he wishes to split them. If he enters 'N' the play continues as normal. If he enters 'Y', the two cards are split and a second card dealt to each. The punter now has two separate hands with the same stake on each.

 

If his first two cards total eleven, a punter is asked if he wants to double. If he enters 'N' the play continues as normal. If he enters 'Y' his stake is doubled.

 

Each punter is invited to TWIST (enter T) or STICK (enter S) until he is satisfied with his total or BUST. If a hand is split, the upper hand is dealt with first, and all transactions are completed on this hand before the lower hand is considered.

 

After the banker's play, each punter's losses or gains will be indicated, in turn, before going on to the next hand. For a split hand, the message for the upper hand is given first.

 

When a human punter is banker (one opponent game), the computer has the same opportunities as a normal player. Any change of bank will be indicated.

 

The Rules Of The Game

A standard 52 card pack is used. Suits are irrelevant, all that matters is the numerical face value of the card. Cards from two to ten count as their spot value, court cards as ten and Aces as one or eleven - at the player's discretion.

 

The object of the game is to finish with a better hand than the banker's. A hand whose cards total over 21 beats the banker if the banker has a lower scoring hand or is 'BUST'.

 

There are two special hands:

 

NATURAL: 21 on two cards. This beats the banker.

 

FIVE CARD TRICK: A hand of five cards that is not bust. This beats all except the banker's Natural or Five Card Trick and scores double.

 

The Play

Each player receives his first card, and stakes on it an amount that lies between limits, entitling him to receive a second card. If the second card is of the same denomination as the first, the player may choose to split them and play two hands. In this case, another card is dealt to each hand, the same money being staked on each hand. The banker may not split his own cards.

 

If a player's first two cards total eleven, he may double his stake.

 

The banker addresses himself to each player. He must finish all transactions with one player before he goes on to the next one. If the player is satisfied with his total, he can 'STICK'. If not, he may have up to three more cards 'TWIST'ed face up until he sticks or is 'BUST'.

 

The banker must play before collecting the stakes of any players who are bust. He turns his cards face up, and deals himself more cards until he is satisfied with his total. If he is BUST, he collects the stakes of the players who are bust, and pays the others the amount they staked, (double for special hands as previously described). If he has a Natural or Five Card Trick, he collects double stakes. With a total under 22, he pays those with a higher count, or better hand; and collects

from equal, lower or bust hands. With a Five Card Trick, he beats a player's Five Card Trick, but not a player's Natural.

 

The cards are gathered, shuffled, and the next hand is dealt. The bank changes hands when a player, other than the banker, has a Natural.

 

The History Of Poker

Poker, by all accounts, emerged in New Orleans at about 1820, and spread along the Mississippi in the steam-boat saloons. It was first played with twenty cards, straights and flushes not being recognised, though within ten years, the pack became 52.

 

The Draw appears to have been introduced during the American Civil War. Straights were ranked at around 1860-65; Flushes, though not clear, somewhat earlier. To complete the suite of games, Stud seems to have appeared at around 1870.

 

The derivation of the name is not clear. One theory is that the name was a Southern corruption of the French three card game Poque, possibly combined with the ancient Persian game, An Nas, which could have reached America via French settlers, who has been in Persian service. Another theory is that the name derives from the German game, Pochspiel, in which a player passed by knocking on the table and saying, "Ich poche".

 

The original game was Straight Poker, in which five cards were dealt. One period of betting followed - the winner of that taking the pot. From this developed Draw Poker, in which, after the first betting period, each player could seek to improve his hand by discarding some of his hand and 'draw'ing replacements. A second period of betting ensued before a winner could be determined.

 

Draw Poker is still regarded as the basic game and is recommended for beginners and home play. Serious players are now devoted to various forms of the next development, Stud Poker. In this development, each player receives five or more cards, from which he selects any five as his eventual playing hand. Some of these cards are dealt face down (hole cards) for the player's eyes only, others face upwards (upcards) for all

to see. There is no draw, but betting periods follow the deal of successive cards, giving more opportunity for betting and the application of skill.

 

Vingt-un

Vingt-un, more commonly known as Pontoon, is the not-quite-French for the magic twenty-one, on which the whole game is based. The American version, and it is only an equivalent, is known as Blackjack.

 

There are no hard and fast rules laid down for the game. The basic object is to acquire cards whose combined face values must get as close to, or equal, 21.

 

Vingt-un is a banking game and one of the few that rewards skill; hence the popularity over the years, being recognised as a game that may be played for pleasure as well as money.

Blackjack

Blackjack is the American equivalent of Pontoon. A count of 21 on two cards is known as a Natural. Players 'buy in' before the deal. If a player has a Natural, the banker pays him and collects from the others, without further play - otherwise they may 'STICK' on any total or call for a 'TWIST' for as many more cards as they wish, these being dealt face up. If the first two cards total 11, the player may double his stake 'double down'; the rule may be extended to totals of 10 or 9.

 

Optional payoff hands, calling for immediate payment from the banker, include: five, or more card tricks, paying double for each card over a four; 21 with 6-7-8, paying double, 21 with three sevens paying treble.

 

It should be noted, that these rules are those generally played to in American Casinos, and are given for interest only.

 

 

Instructions' Source†† : ACES HIGH (Oasis) Back Inlay And Booklet

 

Review (Electron User)

ACES HIGH is a compilation package of four card games. These can be played either against the computer or between up to five opponents, depending on the game selected.

 

Draw poker and stud poker are played by the user against as many as
five computer opponents. You are allocated £1,000 to start with, and the game ends when one player has accumulated all the money. The computer is always dealer and always to the same player first, which detracts a little from the reality of the game.


You are given the opportunity to fold, check, call or raise, depending on your hand. Don't worry if you don't understand these terms, or even if you don't know how to play poker, because all is adequately explained in a very handy, explicit booklet which is incorporated in the package.


Blackjack and Pontoon are very similar, but have subtle differences which become clear when you use ACES HIGH. You win the chance to become banker if you get pontoon (in the game pontoon, that is) or a natural (in blackjack).


Again you are given £1,000 to start, and again play continues until one player has accumulated all the cash. All the programs are very simple to use and, as well as the booklet, instructions are given throughout the games.


They couldn't really go wrong with the graphics, but the cards are well depicted and the layouts good.


The games, as you would expect, are aimed at the more mature market, but kids from about ten years old upwards will enjoy the simpler pontoon and blackjack. As it is, ACES HIGH gives all the family the chance to enjoy losing their shirts without really noticing it.

Adam Young, ELECTRON USER 2.11