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GYROSCOPE

 

 

Professional, Originally Released On Cassette Only

 

Game Type : Arcade

Authors : John Nixon and David Wainwright

Standalone Release(s) : 1985: GYROSCOPE, Melbourne House, 9.95

Compilation Release(s) : None

Stated compatibility : Electron Side A/BBC Side B

Actual compatibility : As stated

Supplier : MELBOURNE HOUSE, Castle Yard House, Castle Yard, RICHMOND

TW10 6TF

Disc compatibility : Unknown

 

 

Instructions

"GYROSCOPE - the game to send you spinning off your head! Attempt to guide a fast and furiously gyrating gyroscope across twelve separate screens. Make the most of your seven lives in this unique arcade strategy challenge. But we have to tell you - it's not easy! Steep slops, slippey glass, directional magnets, aliens and narrow ledges are among the many obstacles you will find in this amazing 3D scenario. Hi-resolution graphics and superby synthesiser music combine to create the atmosphere of this compulsively addictive game."

 

The player should manoeuvre the gyroscope from the top of each course to the bottom. There are three screens per course to negotiate in order to successfully complete the game. Five types of obstacles stand in the way of your progress:

* steep slopes

* slippery glass

* directional magnet

* aliens, and

* narrow ledges.

When you reach the end of the course, you must move onto the character square which appears as a diamond across twelve tiles.

 

Once the game has been successfully completed, there is a real surprise in store!

 

Lives System

The player has seven "lives" or gyroscopes with which to complete the course, with an extra life for every 1,000 points. If he falls off the edge or hits an alien, the gyroscope will fall over and the player will lose a "life". At the top of the screen is a clock which ticks down. If this reaches zero, the gyroscope will stop spinning and fall over, with the loss of one "life". Play will continue with a new gyroscope which will appear on the spot at which the previous one fell over.

 

Game Controls

Z - Left, X - Right, * - Up, / - Down

The cursor keys may also be used.

 

 

Instructions' Source : GYROSCOPE (Melbourne House) Back and Inner Inlay

 

Review (Electron User)

The scenario in this arcade style game is of a gyroscope, spinning and falling down hills. You control it using the usual four keys for left, right, up and down. Your aim is to steer it along narrow causeways and into a little hole.


This may sound easy but most of the slopes are on a diagonal course with precipitous hair-pin bends, which require skilful handling of the control keys.


Magnets are strewn about the place to make your task more complex. These turn your gyroscope into a whirling dervish, flying hither and thither like a ball on a pin table. As if this weren't enough, there are also aliens, hell-bent on knocking the gyroscope over. They take the form of arm-waving ghosts, sidewinder snakes, rival gyroscopes and fried eggs.


If the gyroscope falls off a path or is knocked over, you lose one of your seven lives. To complete the game you must master four routes, each consisting of four screens vertically. The instructions promise a surprise when the game is completed, but I've only mastered three routes so far.

 

The graphics are of a very good quality, with pleasing use of colour, except for an unnecessary flashing at the start. Sadly, a couple of problems spoil what could be a very good game. Sometimes, a magnet captures the gyroscope and the game seems to freeze, whilst emitting an irritating noise. It is also possible for an alien to be at the spot where the gyroscope re-starts after falling over, which means all seven lives can be lost. Such bugs should not appear in software priced at 8.95.


Sound ........................... 5
Graphics ........................ 6
Playability ..................... 6
Value for money ................. 4
Overall ......................... 6

Rog Frost, ELECTRON USER 3. 8