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PADDINGTON AND THE DISAPPEARING INK

 

 

Professional, Originally Released On Cassette Only

 

Game Type          : Educational Compendium; Ages 7-9

Author             :

Standalone Release(s)   : 1983: PADDINGTON AND THE DISAPPEARING INK, Collins, £9.95

Compilation Release(s) : None

Stated compatibility    : Electron

Actual compatibility    : Electron, BBC B, B+ and Master 128

Supplier            : COLLINS. No further information.

Disc compatibility     : CDFS E00, DFS E00

 

 

Instructions

"This pack consists of a Paddington illustrated storybook and a cassette to run on your home computer.

 

"One morning Paddington was in the garden testing some tricks from his conjuring outfit when he came across one he hadn't noticed before. It was called magic disappearing ink and it looked very interesting indeed.

 

"So starts Paddington's encounter with the magic ink. Join him and help Paddington write his postcard.

 

"The programs continue Paddington's adventure and provide practice in basic letter writing skills and activities.

 

"The programs are: LETTER* TYPEWRITER* POSTHASTE* WORKCHECK* PERU"

 

One morning Paddington was in the garden testing some tricks from his conjuring outfit when he came across one he hadn't noticed before.

 

It was called MAGIC DISAPPEARING INK and it looked very interesting indeed.

 

There were three bottles inside the box.

 

There was a black bottle which was full of everlasting ink that never disappeared; a red one containing some special ink which vanished soon after you had put it on; and a green bottle full of liquid which you brushed on to bring the words back again.

 

It sounded very good value indeed.

 

Paddington was very keen on trying anything new and he decided he would write a postcard to his Aunt Lucy telling her all about it.

 

Paddington's Aunt Lucy lived in the Home for Retired Bears in Lima and she liked getting postcards, although he wasn't able to send her one very often because the stamps were expensive and he didn't always have enough bun money left at the end of the week.

 

All the same, he felt sure she would like a 'magic' postcard.

 

First of all he wrote her address on the front of the card. He did it with the special everlasting ink in case the postman had trouble delivering it. It cost a lot of money to send even a postcard to Peru and Paddington didn't want to risk losing it.

 

Then he wrote what he wanted to say on the other side of the card. Most of the words he wrote in everlasting ink, but some he wrote with the magic disappearing ink, and sure enough, after a few minutes in the sun they had completely vanished.

 

'Deer Aunt Lucy,

'I am sitting in the garden writing this postcard with magic disappearing ink. The sun is shining. The flowers are out. I am well. I hope you are well 2.

'Love Padingtun.

'P.S. I have a jar of marmalade in case I get hungry.'

 

"Bear!" barked Mr Curry. "What are you doing, bear?"  

 

Paddington nearly fell off his chair with alarm at the sound of Mr Curry's voice. The Browns' neighbour was well known for poking his nose into other people's affairs, and it usually meant trouble.

 

"I didn't know you were spying on me, Mr Curry," he began. "I mean..."

 

"SPYING?!" bellowed Mr Curry. "How dare you, bear!"

 

He glared at the bottle in Paddington's paw. "What have you got there?"

 

"It's some special 'magic' ink, Mr Curry," said Paddington.

 

"MAGIC ink, eh?" said Mr Curry. A crafty look came into his eyes. "That sounds just what I need for my garden labels. I've been planting some seeds and I don't trust the birds.

 

"I always tie the empty packets onto sticks to show where they are," continued Mr Curry. "But I'm sure they look at the picutres. There's one at it already. What I need is some ink that won't come off. Even birds can't read," he added with a chuckle.

 

"Oh, they won't be able to read this ink, Mr Curry," said Paddington truthfully. He was about to add that Mr Curry wouldn't be able to read it either, but before he had a chance to, the Browns' neighbour had grabbed the bottle.

 

"If all my seeds come up," said Mr Curry, as he let Paddington back into his own garden, "I MAY give you five pence, but THAT won't be for several weeks."

 

Paddington had a nasty feeling he would be hearing from the Browns' neighbour long before then, but he didn't stop to argue.

 

Once inside the safety of his own garden, Paddington consulted the book belonging to his conjuring outfit.

 

He was rather hoping there might be some instructions on how to make bears disappear, but he was out of luck.

 

In any case, he had hardly reached the end of the first chapter when Mr Curry's head reappeared over the top of the fence.

 

"Bear!" he bellowed for the umpteenth time that morning. "What trickery have you been up to now? All the writing on my lables has vanished! AND I've thrown the seed packets away. I shan't know where anything is now."

 

Paddington took a deep breath. "Well, Mr Curry," he said. "I've got some special liquid that will make it come back again. But I'm afraid it's expensive."

 

"Expensive?" repeated Mr Curry. "How expensive?"

 

"Very," said Paddington firmly. "But you can pay me for it in stamps if you like."

 

Mr Curry gave Paddington a long hard look and then took out his purse. He knew when he was beaten.

 

"If you like," said Paddington generously, "you can keep the bottle until the seeds start to come up before you use it. Then no-one will know which seeds are where."

 

Paddington had suddenly realised Mr Curry had done him a good turn. Unless he'd send the bottle to his Aunt Lucy, she wouldn't have been able to make the words reappear anyway.

 

He was about to fill in the missing spaces on his postcard with the everlasting ink when he had an even better idea.

 

He made lots of drawings instead.

 

'Deer Aunt Lucy,

'(Eye) am sitting in the garden writing this (Postcard) with magic disa(Paddington PEERING through a fence) ink. The (Sun) is shining. The (Flowers) are out. I am (Well). I hope you are (Well) 2.

'Love Padingtun.

'(Pea).S. (Eye) have a (Jar) of marmalade in (Case) (Eye) get hungry.'

 

Before he posted his card, Paddington added another postscript.

 

'(Pea).(Pea).S. Mr Curry very kindly paid for the (Stamp). I will tell you all about it one day.'

 

 

Instructions' Source   : PADDINGTON AND THE DISAPPEARING INK (Collinsoft) Booklet

 

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