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PADDINGTON'S EARLY VISIT

 

 

Professional, Originally Released On Cassette Only

 

Game Type          : Educational Compendium; Ages 4-6

Author             :

Standalone Release(s)   : 1983: PADDINGTON'S EARLY VISIT, Collins, £9.95

Compilation Release(s) : None

Stated compatibility    : Electron

Actual compatibility    : Electron, BBC B, B+ and Master 128

Supplier            : COLLINS. No further information.

Disc compatibility     : CDFS E00, DFS E00

 

 

Instructions

"This pack consists of a Paddington illustrated storybook and a cassette to run on your home computer.

 

"One day Jonathan and Judy gave Paddington a bedside clock as a present. "It's got special hands that shine in the dark," said Judy. "If you wake up in the night, you won't need a torch to see what the time is."

 

""Be careful, though," warned Jonathan. "It's very modern. It has lines instead of figures. But you'll soon get used to it."

 

"So starts Paddington's encounter with his new clock. Join him and help Paddington sort out the muddle.

 

"The programs continue Paddington's adventure and provide practice in telling the time and reading clocks.

 

"The programs are: WAYUP * FIGURES * DIGITAL * CLOCK * STOPWATCH"

 

One day, Jonathan and Judy gave Paddington a bedside clock as a present.

 

"It's got special hands that shine in the dark, said Judy. "If you wake up in the night, you won't need a torch to see what the time is."

 

"Be careful, though," warned Jonathan. "It's very modern. It has lines instead of figures. But you'll soon get used to it."

 

Paddington thought it was the nicest clock he had ever seen and he went to bed extra early so that he could test it under the bedclothes. The only trouble was that being summer it was hot beneath the blankets, he soon fell asleep.

 

He dreamed he was shipwrecked on a desert island. It was very rocky and not at all comfortable.

 

When he woke he found to his surprise that he hadn't been shipwrecked at all. He had been lying on his new clock. It was little wonder that it had felt uncomfortable.

 

It was as he took a closer look at the clock in order to make sure it was all right that he had his second shock, for the hands said ten minutes to eleven. He must have overslept!

 

Paddington jumped out of bed and after a quick wash, hurried out of the house as fast as his legs would carry him. Every morning he had his elevenses' with his friend, Mr Gruber, and he didn't want to risk being late and finding his cocoa had got cold.

 

On the way to Mr Gruber's shop, he decided he wasn't the only one to have overslept that morning. There wasn't a sign of anyone else about.

 

Even Mr Gruber's antique shop still had its shutters up, which was most unusual, for Mr Gruber was an early riser.

 

Paddington tried throwing some old bottle tops up at the window to waken him.

 

When Mr Gruber finally appeared he looked most surprised to see Paddington.

 

"Is anything the matter, Mr Brown?" he asked.

 

Paddington held up his clock. "I think everyone must have overslept this morning," he exclaimed. "I'm just going to the baker's to fetch our buns!"

 

Mr Gruber looked at his watch. "I don't think you will be very popular if you do," he said. "I've heard of the early bird catching the worm but I doubt if the early bear will get many buns. It isn't even six o' clock yet!

 

"I don't think you have overslept, Mr Brown. I think you have underslept. You had better some inside and have some breakfast."

 

Paddington settled himself on the horsehair sofa at the back of the shop and watched while his friend prepared some bacon and eggs, sausages, tomato and baked beans; not to mention a large plateful of toast and marmalade.

 

He licked his lips. "I think I might undersleep every morning, Mr Gruber," he announced.

 

Mr Gruber coughed slightly as he poured out some cocoa. He was a kindly man at heart and he didn't wish to sound unwelcoming. On the other hand, he didn't fancy the idea of getting up quite so early every day of the week.

 

"I think we had better solve your problem first, Mr Brown," he said. "May I see your new clock?"

 

As Mr Gruber examined Paddington's clock his face cleared. "I think I can see the answer," he said.

 

"You see...if I hold it this way it says seven o' clock. But you try turning it round the other way."

 

Paddington did as he was told, and then nearly fell off the sofa with astonishment, for his clock now said five minutes past six.

 

"That's the correct time," said Mr Gruber. "You see, Mr Brown, things aren't exactly what they seem - especially when it comes to telling the time. It depends which way you look at it. When you thought your clock said ten minutes to eleven it was really twenty past five."

 

"I think I shall use a sun dial in future, Mr Gruber," said Paddington. "They never go wrong."

 

"But not much good under the bedclothes," said Mr Gruber. "I have an even better idea." And he gave Paddington a special label to stick on the back of his clock. It showed a picture of a wine glass.

 

"It shows when things are the right way up," he explained. "It means the same thing all over the world, so you need never go wrong again - wherever you are."

 

Paddington thanked Mr Gruber for his help.

 

"I think I may stick one on my hat as well," he announced. "Just to be on the safe side. You never know - I may go to Australia one day!"

 

 

Instructions' Source   : PADDINGTON'S EARLY VISIT (Collinsoft) Booklet

 

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